Bougainville

bougainville

This caractère room of 20m2, with it's natural and soft tones, wood ceiling and exposed beam, is composed with an independant bathroom with one vask, bathtub, towel dryer and hair dryer. It is equiped with a king size bed of 160.

 

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A piece of history

Louis Antoine de Bougainville was born on November 11, 1729 in Paris. Coming from a bourgeois family, he is the son of a notary and alderman of the city of Paris.

He undertakes long studies at the University College and marks special skills for mathematics. In 1754 he publish a treatise on integral calculus which has retained a certain reputation.

He became a lawyer, but he quickly gave up this career to embrace the military path. He entered the Black Musketeers and became General Chevert's aide-de-camp. In 1756 he was part of the Canadian expedition under Montcalm.

In 1759 Bougainville was promoted colonel. In 1763, he left the army to enter the navy where he was appointed captain of the ship. With two ships, Aigle and Sphinx, he left to found a colony in the Malvinas Islands. Three years later, by order of King Louis XV, he handed the Malouines to the Spaniards, whom the English will soon take back to give them the name of Falklands.

In 1766 he undertakes the journey around the world that will make him famous. With “Boudeuse” and “L'Étoile”, he left Brest in 1766. Through the Strait of Magellan he won the South Seas. His journey took him to New Cythera in April 1768 (Tahiti), then to Samoa, the Great Cyclades (New Hebrides), New Britain (Bismarck Islands), New Guinea, Mauritius. After crossing the Cape of Good Hope, it goes back to Saint-Malo, where it dock after two and a half years of travel. His story published in 1771 under the name of "Voyage around the world" is a huge success.

He plans a new discovery trip to the North Pole, but the Minister of Brienne refuses him this favor. In 1790, he received the command of the Brest fleet, but unable to appease the troubles that occur there, he left the navy after having refused the ministry in 1792 to devote himself to the study of sciences.

Bougainville is arrested during the Terror and released following the fall of Robespierre. In 1796, he was elected a member of the Institute and a member of the Bureau des Longitudes. Bonaparte the height of dignity: senator in 1799, grand officer of the Legion of Honor in 1804, Earl of Empire in 1808.

He presides the War Council which judges the persons responsible for the disaster of Trafalgar in 1809. This will be his last official function. He died on August 31, 1811.

Bourbon

bourbon

This caractère room of 20m2, with it's natural and soft tones, wood ceiling and exposed beam, is composed with an independant bathroom with one vask, a shower, towel dryer and hair dryer. It is equiped with a king size bed of 160.

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A piece of history

In 1767, the East India Company definitively surrendered “Ile Bourbon” to the king who administered it directly. It’s governor remains dependent of the “Islands of France” and “Bourbon”, installed in Port-Louis, who is lieutenant general of the King and military leader, assisted by an authorizing officer in charge of the economic and financial administration, placed under the authority of the steward of the “Ile de France”. Two authorizing officers are distinguished by their activity: Crémont (1767-1778) and Thibaut de Chanvalon (1785-1789).

Until then, known in French under the name of Mascarene, it becomes under the name of Bourbon a stopover of the French East Indies Company then quickly turns into a strategic counter of the route of the Indies because of the rise of the coffee trade from the 1710s.

Soon a true plantation company, the colony then went under the direct control of the King of France in the 1760s before being reassigned to sugar cane cultivation at the end of the Napoleonic Wars, then to be definitively renamed his current name, Reunion, and deprived of the use of slavery in 1848. It follows an economic crisis to which a definitive term will be put only with its transformation into a French department in 1946.

Saint Aloüarn

saint-alouarn

This caractère room of 20m2, with it's natural and soft tones, wood ceiling and exposed beam, is composed with an independant bathroom with one vask, a bathtub, towel dryer and hair dryer. It is equiped with a king size bed of 160.

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A piece of history

In 1772, Louis de Saint-Aloüarn was the commander of “Gros Ventre”, the second boat of the Kerguelen de Trémarec expedition on Fortune. Expedition, authorized by Louis XV, which aimed to discover the fifth continent.

In February 1772, "La Fortune" and "The Gros-Ventre" are in the South Indian Ocean, when the 12th, Yves de Kerguelen on "La Fortune" sees the islands that will bear his name, the Kerguelen Islands. He thinks he has reached the Southern continent, and gives this land the name of Southern France without being able to disembark because of bad weather.

After consultation with Louis de Saint-Aloüarn second of the expedition and commander of "Le Gros-Ventre", Kerguelen sends him the Ensign of Rosily-Mesros (future Admiral and Earl of Empire) with the big boat of "La Fortune", to attempt a landing. Two days later, with great difficulty, the Ensign of Boisgnehennec, second of "Le Gros-Ventre" landed with Rosily-Mesros and took possession of the territory in the name of King Louis XV.

A storm then separating the two ships, Kerguelen returned to France, without waiting for Saint-Aloüarn and "Le Gros-Ventre" ... nor Rosily-Mesros.

Meanwhile "The Big-Belly" continued the exploration campaign more seriously, only returning to the island of France on September 5, 1772, after exploring Timor and Australian coasts, Rosily-Mesros doing very good surveys. river. Alas Louis de Saint-Aloüarn will die soon after his arrival.

On January 16, 1998, a Franco-Australian expedition had just discovered a bottle buried in the sand of the desert coast of Dirk Hartog Island, on the North-West of the mainland island, the proofs of the taking possession of the Australia in the name of King Louis XV of France, March 30, 1772, by a Breton naval officer, Louis de Saint-Aloüarn.

Samoa

samoa

This caractère room of 20m2, with it's natural and soft tones, wood ceiling and exposed beam, is composed with an independant bathroom with one vask, a bathtub, towel dryer and hair dryer. It is equiped with a king size bed of 160. You will have access to your own terrace and the garden.

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A piece of history

Populated for about 3,000 years by a Polynesian people, Samoa was occupied around 1000 BC Jacob Roggeveen was the first Dutchman to identify the archipelago in 1722.

In 1768, the French explorer Louis-Antoine de Bougainville passed the archipelago which he named the Navigator Islands. The first European navigator to set foot on one of the islands of the archipelago was Jean François de Galaup, count of Lapérouse in 1787.

He landed on the island of Tutuila (now in American Samoa) before being attacked by the population. His second in command, the Viscount of Langle and 11 crew members were killed. These first difficult contacts between Samoans and Europeans gave to the archipelago the reputation of being not hospitable consequently of which this one was little visited.

Vanikoro

vanikoro

This caractère room of 20m2, with it's natural and soft tones, wood ceiling and exposed beam, is composed with an independant bathroomwith one vask, a shower, towel dryer and hair dryer. It is equiped with a king size bed of 160. You will also have access to your own terrace and the garden.

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A piece of history

It was at Vanikoro, located in the “Solomon” Islands archipelago, that the members of the Lapérouse expedition died in 1788.

Commander Dumont d'Urville left Toulon in April 1825 to conduct a new discovery expedition whose road was to pass where the traces of the sinking of the Astrolabe and the Boussole were supposed to be, the two ships of the Lapérouse expedition. It was not until 1826-1827 that a British merchant captain, Peter Dillon, discovered remains of the sinking on Vanikoro Atoll with the Astrolabe's bell; as for the Compass, there is not the slightest trace of it.

Peter Dillon learns from the testimony of natives of Vanikoro Island how two large ships would have been stranded by a night of great storm: one would have sunk right, the other would have stranded on the coral reef and the survivors would have settled on the island. Five or six months later, some of the survivors would leave on board a small boat made from the wreckage of the big ship. Two men remained on the island: one would have died quickly, the other would have left the island with a tribal leader in disgrace.

Dumont d'Urville then goes to Vanikoro and inaugurates on March 14, 1828 a monument of wood and coral in memory of Lapérouse and his crew.

In 2005, the wrecks of the Boussole and the Astrolabe, the two Lapérouse ships were formally identified, as well as the traces of a camp on the ground occupied for several years. In 2008, under the direction of Admiral Battet, leader of the ultimate expedition destined to unravel a 220-year-old mystery, two ships of the French Navy spent a month, from September 15 to October 15, to examine, at using the most sophisticated technical means, all the assumptions about the survival of survivors of the sinking of the Astrolabe.

Kerguelen

kerguelen

This caractère room of 20m2, with it's natural and soft tones, wood ceiling and exposed beam, is composed with an independant bathroom with one vask, a shower, towel dryer and hair dryer. It is equiped with a king size bed of 160.

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A piece of history

Yves Joseph of Kerguelen de Trémarec (February 13, 1734, manor of Trémarec, Landudal (Finistère) - March 3, 1797, Paris) is a naval officer and a French navigator, discoverer of the southern seas.

Having no fortune, he embarked at 16 as a marine guard in the Royal Navy after studying at a college of Jesuits. On the occasion of an assignment in Dunkirk, he married in 1758 Marie-Laurence de Bonte. His father-in-law, former burgomaster of Dunkirk, armed the Sage, a ship of 56 guns and 450 crewmen, racing during the Seven Years' War. Kerguelen took command in 1761 to lead a campaign in the Caribbean, which will prove very fruitful.

Lieutenant in 1763, he carried out hydrographic surveys in Brittany, which determined his admission to the Navy Academy as a deputy member.

In 1767, he obtained the command of La Folle to carry out a campaign of protection of cod fishermen in Iceland. In 1768, he returned to the North Atlantic (Greenland and Bergen) with the corvette l'Hirondelle and became familiar with navigation in the cold seas. In 1768 he brought back two white bears for the menagerie of King Louis XV.

"I went to Versailles in September 1770, to propose to the Duke de Praslin, Minister of the Navy, the plan for a discovery campaign in the Antarctic seas. I saw that it was not the moment to undertake such operations. [...] The affairs having then [arranged] with the court of England, [...] the occasion became favorable to propose the voyage of discovery. [...] I was given the command of the ship of King Berrier, who was in the East. [...] I embarked 14 months of food for 300 crewmen. [...] The first day of May [1771], I set sail. [...] I cut the line on June 10 by twenty-two degrees west longitude of the meridian of Paris, which I will always use [...] I arrived at the Isle of France August 20. "

During his stopover on the island of France, he is well received by the governor of Roches and Intendant Poivre. He also meets Commerson, Marion-Dufresne, and the young Lapérouse. He replaces his big ship against the flute La Fortune and the gabarre Gros Ventre, two lighter ships, better adapted to the object of his mission. On February 12, 1772, in the southern Indian Ocean, he saw a land where he thought he saw the southern continent, and gave it the name of southern France. It is actually the Kerguelen Islands. Heavy weather prevents any landing until February 14, the day a sign can land and take possession of the territory in the name of the king.

The storm separates the ships, and Kerguelen continues on his way alone, abandoning the Big Belly then commanded by Louis de Saint Aloüarn. He arrives at Brest on July 16, 1772, while the second ship awaits him and searches for him in vain. It will continue the stops in the order announced, in appalling conditions, to Timor and the Australian coast before returning to the Île de France on September 5th. Despite this adventure, Lapérouse tells us that Kerguelen was received in France as a new Christopher Columbus. At Versailles, he gives the king a very optimistic description of the resources of the lands he had discovered, convincing the king to order a second expedition. He does not know yet that the Big Belly has reappeared, nor that the testimonies of the survivors go against his.

Siam

siam

This caractère room of 20m2, with it's natural and soft tones, wood ceiling and exposed beam, is composed with an independant bathroom with one vask, a shower, towel dryer and hair dryer. It is equiped with a king size bed of 160.

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A piece of history

In 1741, Pierre Poivre (who will become steward of the Mascarenes on the “Ile de France” where he will later host the navigator Kerguelen) is destined for the evangelization of the Far East and embarks for China but his taste for adventure quickly extinguishes its religious vocation. He travels and is interested in everything related to trade and agriculture. He is the first to describe lychee. A little later, his nephew, Pierre Sonnerat, naturalist and explorer published in 1782 his Voyage to India and China made from 1774 until 1781.

Louis XV and Louis XVI widely open the coffers of the state to finance the huge expenses that these expeditions entail. The Compagnie des Indes therefore pursues its commercial activities, to which is added the evangelization of the colonized countries.

Despite the problems encountered in Siam by Catholic priests, the Foreign Missions of Paris (MEP) regularly send priests to this region of Asia. In 1713, following the Burmese invasion of Siam, Brother Pierre Pigneau of Behaine with his 40 students, found refuge in Malacca on the way back to India.

In 1767, Jean-François de Surville, a Breton merchant, asked the East India Company for the right to trade in their territories. He will leave to discover New Zealand. On June 2, 1767, he arrived in the Straits of Malacca and one can probably imagine that he also stopped in Singapore to refuel in food and drinking water before going to explore the Pacific.